Racket

Racket

Racket is “a brand-new writer-owned, reader-funded website founded by a group of former City Pages editors.” As the last theater critic at City Pages, a Minneapolis alt-weekly that shuttered during the Covid-19 pandemic, I’m proud to be the first theater writer who wrote for Racket. My first feature was a profile of Pillsbury House Theatre, a longstanding south Minneapolis institution that has become an even more important organization for the Black community in the wake of George Floyd’s murder.

Other pieces I’ve written for Racket:

  • Frozen Also Beat the Vikings Last Night (October 4, 2021) “Once the diligently masked and vax-checked theatergoers made it past the orange-clad cordon and an inflatable linebacker, they manifested an energy beyond any Super Bowl win. (Not that Minnesotans will ever know.)”
  • Theater’s Back, Baby! (October 7, 2021) “That thing where someone needs you to stand up so they can squeeze past you to their seat — and they apologize like they’re asking you to donate a kidney? It’s back. Those murmurs of appreciation that ripple through the theater as viewers pick up on an unsubtle topical reference? Back! The asks for audience participation? To paraphrase Bill Withers, it feels so good getting used.”
  • Open Access Invites More Actors to Join the Union, But There’s a Catch (November 16, 2021) “To get union benefits, you join the union and do union work. How do you join the union? Well, first you have to get some union work, then you can join the union! Oh, and once you do get that union work and join the union, you won’t be able to do work that’s not union work… and of course, even for union workers, union work isn’t guaranteed.”
  • Meet the MN Book Influencers Blowing Up On TikTok, Instagram (January 26, 2022) “Bookstagram — and its TikTok analog, ‘BookTok’ — took off during Covid lockdown, as bookworms found themselves having a lot of extra reading time. […] While publishers are increasingly counting on social media influencers to promote their books, the community is also often misrepresented and misunderstood.”